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using acual injuries in powerpoint slides for training
bryn9 Offline
#1 Posted : 02 March 2012 13:06:36(UTC)
bryn9


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Is there a problem with showing actual injury's on the powerpoint, as part of training. Some providers do not like it, others do.  Im happy with it as long as its not to graffic, Examples would be avulsion, open fractures etc.
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Fred Offline
#2 Posted : 02 March 2012 15:30:06(UTC)
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Will depend on the course. What would be the point of showing a traumatic amputation picture caused by an IED for a FAW bleeds presentation.
On the other hand, a Afghanistan Contractor pre-deployment course might benefit from some slightly more realistic training, including photos of what they might come across

That's my view anyway
kevwilson Offline
#3 Posted : 02 March 2012 22:12:33(UTC)
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So long as they are not too graphic, I personally do not have a problem showing pictures or mpeg clips. I would give a warning before hand so those that shall we say have a delicate constitution, or have personal experiences that are too close to home have the opportunity to close their eyes, or go for a break etc.

I have shown them on many occasions and yes I have been caught out before by individuals who suddenly leave the room for no apparent reason, or 1 ruffty tuffty male who fainted.... I have reflected on these experiences and now warn my delegates whats coming up and why etc. Personally, I’d rather they felt queasy in the training than throw up over a bleeding colleague...
alancaulfield Offline
#4 Posted : 03 March 2012 23:11:44(UTC)
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The issue isn't of course with PowerPoint it's simply down to what photos are appropriate to show an audience.

My feelings are if you can't tolerate a photograph you shouldn't be thinking of becoming a first aider.
Dumyat Offline
#5 Posted : 04 March 2012 17:44:30(UTC)
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I have a selection of trauma pictures which I select depending on the clients workplace and if FAAW or a Recert course.



For newbies, I select a picture of a relatively simple injury which the class might come across whilst emphasising that the main difference when real are noise and colour.



Talking about an injury and then seeing a real injury help to impress that simple treatments can make a difference - the challenge being to remain focussed.
bryn9 Offline
#6 Posted : 05 March 2012 08:04:34(UTC)
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Im all for it, they need to be aware of, and how to recognise the types of wounds, breaks and burns. I also tailor they type of pictures to the group, say a nursing home to lads who work on a building site.
ppp Offline
#7 Posted : 06 March 2012 15:10:40(UTC)
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I don't agree with the comment about not being a first aider if you can't tolerate a picture. I am a registered paramedic on a rapid response car, I have dealt with some horrific accidents which would turn your stomach but yet I cannot watch operations and the likes on the tv nor do I like to see pictures of injuries. I do show some pictures on the powerpoint but I do warn the delegates and I reiterate that you can still handle emergencies even if you can't stand the pictures.
nicktriplel Offline
#8 Posted : 06 March 2012 18:00:44(UTC)
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I too do not agree with the comment about if you cant look at a photo you shouldnt be a first aider as I too can not look at the photos, but faced in real circumstances at work fairly regularly I am competant and able to deal with these, so not being able to look at a photo or video of a serious injury shouldnt stop people from being first aiders. 
TLC Offline
#9 Posted : 06 March 2012 23:18:32(UTC)
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We are all different and have different learning styles, I am a visual learner so photos/videos and all the other visual and hands on prompt’s works for me, good planning and a variety of learning technique is the key.


If your students work is in a call centre or office it’s unlikely that someone will get a leg ripped off, good airway management will save a life, recognition and good treatment of a medical condition is required.


I don’t mind either way I have been a student on lots of first aid courses and never needed real photos, seen a lot of injuries in my time so for me I don’t need the blood and guts.


Interesting topic  

elfshot Offline
#10 Posted : 23 March 2012 17:43:11(UTC)
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First Aid is a very serious subject, and in my opinion, the concept of being a designated first aider is a sobering resonsibility. If a person objects or feels queasy then they should reconsider their chosen/designated role. Saying that, As an instructor, you are not there to judge - use of photos is acceptable, but you must embrace the pastoral responsibilities that you have: explain the situation before you show the pictures and give the students the opportunity to step outside for '5 minutes' while the pictures are being shown. This would then give you the opportunity to chat to those people that left at a later time about the realities of first aid. That is the approach that is adopted at Quercus Training Solutions.
Wiccan Offline
#11 Posted : 26 April 2012 15:00:14(UTC)
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I use photographs of injuries in FAW training both in a PowerPoint presentation and on worksheets where they are given a picture and a list of symptoms that they have to diagnose and treat.  I do warn people before I show them so that the squeemish can look away!
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